Discussing focus through the week, we began with how noise block can improve one’s concentration, how to discipline your thought process,  how to rationalise distractions and how small breaks can improve your focus.

It is impossible to like “what you do” or “need to do” at every single occasion. Most people persevere through it with a little bit of self-deception. Tasks which are not passionately perceived by the doer are mostly looked at from a goal-oriented fashion. The trick is to have a clear vision of the end point and know exactly how to get there strategically.

Just when you’re about to lose your focus or motivation tell yourself that you’d do one more/work 15 more minutes. If you succeed, then try deceiving yourself again. Self-deception is actually not deception of your entire self; simply because you are the deceiver as well as the deceived. This begs the question, is there more than one voice in your head.

The truth is, there are multiple voices in everyone’s head. A thought or a voice is simply an accumulation of expressive opinions piling up and expecting to be addressed. It is not necessary that they need to be addressed; especially when they are negatively oriented. Self-control kicks in for most people automatically beyond a certain point. But imposed self-control is entirely different. Here, another part of yourself; the part that see’s the bigger picture, can be given the power to enforce its opinions against the opinions your innate instinctive impulses (the ones that are more vulnerable to environmental stimuli) make.

Self-deception is a valuable trait for people who choose to be unaffected by uncontrollable external stimuli. It has more to do with not letting frustration get to you to its fullest extent through deniability or re-clarifying the larger picture.

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